Great Service

What makes for great service?  Yesterday I ranted about Starbucks… Today I went to my usual Starbucks and did my usual mobile order.   When I arrived,  one of the ladies saw me,  walked over and handed me my coffee  (with a green stopper thing !) “Here you go Steve”.  Super friendly smile and all.  And the coffee was exactly as I ordered,  of course. Mobile ordering is a godsend.
If that happened every day,  I would consider that GREAT service.
Is Good service,  delivered consistently,  the same as Great service?  I believe so. 
When we ‘deliver’ a report (flash for a manager,  sales by item for a stock host to replenish a floor,  WOS with orders needed already calculated to a buyer,  etc. ) and it comes as expected,  on time,  and accurate,  is that great service? 
If you miss a day,  or the service level drops for a day ( report server failure,  or no one made my coffee! )  the exception makes for bad service. 
So the reverse must be true. 
Be great,  but be great EVERY DAY.

-THAT Planning Guy

Replenishment Failure

My Starbucks ran out of stoppers this morning.  The stupid green stick that keeps my coffee from spilling all over my car.  Wow.
Is it hard to keep in stock of an item that you give away?
Demand= cups X ratio,  where cups = sales fcst X (% hot beverages to sales)
Ratio = average #stoppers given/cups used. 
If you know the sales fcst,  which I bet they do as they likely use for labor fcst  the rest is MATH:
Assume sales is 100, 000 for a month.   (no idea,  made that up)
70% are hot beverages with a price of 4.00. Half of people ask for stoppers.
Demand =((100000 X 70%) /4. 00) X  1/3.  =8750 stoppers needed.   Build in some safety stock to account for lead times.

Now I have to clean coffee off my car seat because someone failed at replenishment.
@starbucks – no charge for this demand forecast lesson. 

-THAT Planning Guy

Relationships

Building a relationship takes a huge amount of time and effort no matter what part of your life.  Girlfriend,  wife,  child,  friend are all difficult enough to manage. 
Work relationships are also a challenge.   NO,  not the Demi Moore “Disclosure” kind of issues… The productive work relationship,  especially from a Planner. 
In Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs,  you move up from Physiological  through love eventually to self actualization. 
Planning relationships go from:
KNOW : I know that person. Email relationship or phone call.
LIKE: yeah,  she always gives me reports and important data.
UNDERSTAND: I see your perspective and know why you think I need to markdown,  or order less. But I may not AGREE or execute.
TRUST: I believe you.  I will cut receipts and it won’t effect sales.

When you reach the level of trust,  the partnership can flourish.  Until then,  it’s generally one sided.  

How do we get there?  That’s another article entirely.
To be continued…

-THAT Planning Guy

Time in the day

If you don’t plan your time,  someone else will. 
This old adage is certainly true for Data people (I like that phrase to cover everyone from analyst to planner,  allocater, Data Scientists,  whatever your taste  may be)
If you leave time ‘open’  someone else will fill it with things they need.  
Is this the best use of time?  Whose priority is more important to accomplish?  If it’s  not your priority,  why are you spending your time?
Time is not replenishable.